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Items filtered by date: April 2022

Tuesday, 26 April 2022 00:00

What Is Raynaud’s Phenomenon?

If you experience unusually cold feet, you may have a condition known as Raynaud’s phenomenon. This condition may simply be caused by over-sensitive blood vessels that constrict abnormally in colder temperatures. It occurs because the small blood vessels spasm and keep the blood from circulating properly. Symptoms may be triggered by a drop in the temperature, as well as anxiety or stress. In many cases no actual cause for Raynaud’s can be found, aside from a disruption in how the nervous system controls the blood vessels. In other cases, it can be linked to underlying causes. Among them are autoimmune conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis or lupus; infections, such as hepatitis; cancer; and certain migraine, blood pressure and heart medications. Injury and overuse has been linked to Raynaud’s phenomenon, as has smoking. Please see a podiatrist for an examination to determine the cause of excessive cold feet. 

While poor circulation itself isn’t a condition; it is a symptom of another underlying health condition you may have. If you have any concerns with poor circulation in your feet contact Dr. Scott Peters of Ankle & Foot Walk-In Clinic. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Poor Circulation in the Feet

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) can potentially lead to poor circulation in the lower extremities. PAD is a condition that causes the blood vessels and arteries to narrow. In a linked condition called atherosclerosis, the arteries stiffen up due to a buildup of plaque in the arteries and blood vessels. These two conditions can cause a decrease in the amount of blood that flows to your extremities, therefore resulting in pain.

Symptoms

Some of the most common symptoms of poor circulation are:

  • Numbness
  • Tingling
  • Throbbing or stinging pain in limbs
  • Pain
  • Muscle Cramps

Treatment for poor circulation often depends on the underlying condition that causes it. Methods for treatment may include insulin for diabetes, special exercise programs, surgery for varicose veins, or compression socks for swollen legs.

As always, see a podiatrist as he or she will assist in finding a regimen that suits you. A podiatrist can also prescribe you any needed medication. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Mayfield Village, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment of Poor Blood Circulation in the Feet
Saturday, 23 April 2022 00:00

It's Time for Beautiful Feet

You don't need an excuse to have beautiful nails. Step outside without worrying about the appearance of your feet.

Wednesday, 20 April 2022 00:00

Various Causes of Heel Pain

Although plantar fasciitis (an inflammation of the plantar fascia ligament on the sole of the foot) is often the root of heel pain, it can come from a variety of other conditions as well. For instance, compression of the medial calcaneal nerve, which travels down the inner part of the ankle, can create a tingling or numb sensation in the heel as well as pain. In older adults, fat pads in the heel can wear down (fat pad atrophy) and cause pain. Systemic inflammatory conditions such as certain types of arthritis, Reiter syndrome, ankylosing spondylitis, and a common type of lupus (systemic lupus erythematosus) may sometimes be associated with heel pain. Sometimes tiny nodules, or plantar fibroma, develop on the plantar fascia which can cause pain in the arch near the heel. To have the cause of your heel pain properly diagnosed and treated, make an appointment with a podiatrist.

Many people suffer from bouts of heel pain. For more information, contact Dr. Scott Peters of Ankle & Foot Walk-In Clinic. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Causes of Heel Pain

Heel pain is often associated with plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a band of tissues that extends along the bottom of the foot. A rip or tear in this ligament can cause inflammation of the tissue.

Achilles tendonitis is another cause of heel pain. Inflammation of the Achilles tendon will cause pain from fractures and muscle tearing. Lack of flexibility is also another symptom.

Heel spurs are another cause of pain. When the tissues of the plantar fascia undergo a great deal of stress, it can lead to ligament separation from the heel bone, causing heel spurs.

Why Might Heel Pain Occur?

  • Wearing ill-fitting shoes                  
  • Wearing non-supportive shoes
  • Weight change           
  • Excessive running

Treatments

Heel pain should be treated as soon as possible for immediate results. Keeping your feet in a stress-free environment will help. If you suffer from Achilles tendonitis or plantar fasciitis, applying ice will reduce the swelling. Stretching before an exercise like running will help the muscles. Using all these tips will help make heel pain a condition of the past.

If you have any questions please contact our office located in Mayfield Village, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Heel Pain

Stress fractures are tiny hairline cracks in the bone, usually the result of overuse common in runners, athletes, and people who spend a great deal of time on their feet. Four main types of stress fractures are navicular, calcaneal, metatarsal and Jones. Each targets a different area of the foot and is brought on by different activities. The navicular stress fracture is often caused by sprinting or jumping. The pain occurs on the top inside arch area of the foot. A calcaneal stress fracture occurs in the heel bone (calcaneus), often found in runners, soldiers, or anyone who marches long distances. A metatarsal stress fracture occurs in one of the long bones in the foot (metatarsals) that connect the toes with the heels. It is usually brought on by overuse or poor biomechanics of the foot and is common in runners, dancers and gymnasts. A Jones stress fracture is specific to the 5th metatarsal, the outermost on the foot. It can be caused by turning over on the side of the foot and affects the end of the bone closest to the ankle. Any of these fractures can be painful and take time to heal. If you think you may have developed a stress fracture, it is a good idea to see a podiatrist as soon as possible for a full diagnosis and options for treatment.

Activities where too much pressure is put on the feet can cause stress fractures. To learn more, contact Dr. Scott Peters from Ankle & Foot Walk-In Clinic. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep your pain free and on your feet.

Dealing with Stress Fractures of the Foot and Ankle

Stress fractures occur in the foot and ankle when muscles in these areas weaken from too much or too little use.  The feet and ankles then lose support when walking or running from the impact of the ground. Since there is no protection, the bones receive the full impact of each step. Stress on the feet can cause cracks to form in the bones, thus creating stress fractures.

What Are Stress Fractures?

Stress fractures occur frequently in individuals whose daily activities cause great impact on the feet and ankles. Stress factors are most common among:

  • Runners                                  
  • People affected with Osteoporosis
  • Tennis or basketball players
  • Gymnasts
  • High impact workouts

Symptoms

Pain from the fractures occur in the area of the fractures and can be constant or intermittent. It will often cause sharp or dull pain with swelling and tenderness. Engaging in any kind of activity which involves high impact will aggravate pain.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Mayfield Village, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Dealing with Stress Fractures of the Foot and Ankle

The Achilles tendon is located in the back of the heel and connects the calf muscles to the heel.  It is used for walking, running, and pointing and flexing the foot. A sudden accident to the foot can result in an Achilles tendon injury, and this can often cause severe pain and discomfort. Some patients experience an Achilles tendon partial rupture which indicates the tendon is still attached to the calf muscles. A complete tear can occur when there is no connection between the tendon and the calf muscles. Common symptoms of this type of injury can include walking flat-footed, bruising, swelling, and the inability to stand on your tiptoes. If you have injured your Achilles tendon, it is strongly suggested that you consult with a podiatrist who can guide you toward correct treatment options, which may include surgery.

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact Dr. Scott Peters of Ankle & Foot Walk-In Clinic. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What Are the Symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Mayfield Village, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Achilles Tendon Injuries

The Achilles tendon is located in the back of the heel and connects the calf muscles to the heel.  It is used for walking, running, and pointing and flexing the foot. A sudden accident to the foot can result in an Achilles tendon injury, and this can often cause severe pain and discomfort. Some patients experience an Achilles tendon partial rupture which indicates the tendon is still attached to the calf muscles. A complete tear can occur when there is no connection between the tendon and the calf muscles. Common symptoms of this type of injury can include walking flat-footed, bruising, swelling, and the inability to stand on your tiptoes. If you have injured your Achilles tendon, it is strongly suggested that you consult with a podiatrist who can guide you toward correct treatment options, which may include surgery.

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact Dr. Scott Peters of Ankle & Foot Walk-In Clinic. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What Are the Symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Mayfield Village, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Achilles Tendon Injuries

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